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Hallelujah, Music Trumps Money

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President Trump has stirred up the most controversy and protest that I can remember out of any of the 5 presidents who have held office since I have been alive. Not to mention he has the lowest approval ratings of any president, ever. Not to say that there hasn’t been protest for the others. I remember George Bush especially, a lot of folks on the Internet were saying that he was the anti-Christ, ha.

Trump however, has already shown his lack of basic concern for a whole shlew of people. Women, immigrants, especially from the near south and far east, anyone who is not a ga-jillionaire, anyone who cares about these people, plants animals and people who are affected and will soon be affected more by climate change; all of us are sort of shaking in our boots to see what Trump will do with the power we granted him over the next four years.

Running rampant along with insults and promises of policies that makes many cringe, are protests of these things. There was the Women’s March on the Capital the day after Trump’s inauguration. Smaller protests were held at State Capitols around the country. There was one in Austin I would have liked to go to. There are also reports of marches in Chicago and Denver to name a few. There are still protests going on to this day.

The lay-woman and -man aren’t the only ones calling attention to issues that have been highlighted by the charged atmosphere of this particular election. Some of my favorite artists decided to comment on this election by releasing a song from their upcoming album.

If you’re a Gorillaz fan, or a Benjamin Clementine fan, definitely go listen to this new track satirically called, “Hallelujah Money.”

Lyrics:

“Here is our tree
That primitively grows
And when you go to bed
Scarecrows from the far east
Come to eat
Its tender fruits
And I thought the best way to perfect our tree
Is by building walls
Walls like unicorns
In full glory
And galore
And even stronger
Than the walls of Jericho
But glad then my friend
Out in the field we shall reap a better day
What we have always dreamt of having
Are now for the starving
It is love, that is the root of all evil
But not our tree
And thank you my friend
For trusting me.

[Hook: Benjamin Clementine (Choir)]
Hallelujah
(Hallelujah)
Hallelujah money
(Past the chemtrails)
Hallelujah money
(Hallelujah money)
Hallelujah money
(Hallelujah money)
Hmmm
Hallelujah money
(Hallelujah)
Hallelujah money
(Oooh)

[Bridge: 2-D]
How will we know?
When the morning comes
We are still human
How will we know?
How will we dream?
How will we love?
How will we know?

[Spoken Verse: Benjamin Clementine]
Don’t worry my friend
If this be the end, then so shall it be
Until we say so, nothing will move
Ah, don’t worry
It’s not against our morals
It’s legal tender
Touch, my friend
While the whole world
And whole beasts of nations desire
Power

[Bridge 2: 2-D]
When the morning comes
We are still human
How will we know?
How will we dream?
How will we love?
How will we know?

[Hook: Benjamin Clementine (Choir)]
(Hallelujah money)
Hallelujah money
(Past the chemtrails)
Hallelujah money
(Hallelujah money)
Hmmm
Hallelujah money
(Hallelujah money)
Hallelujah money
(Oooh)
Hallelujah money
Hallelujah money
Hallelujah
Hallelujah money!”

I love the religious tone in the song. You see it in the lyrics, in the choir singing behind Benjamin Clementine, even some in the melancholy coos of Clementine. I find it sort of ironic that the words at once draw metaphors from the Bible, as well as speaking satirically about the morals embodied by our new president and by many in the United States.

The “tender fruits” from “our garden” are so precious that they need “walls…even stronger…than those of Jericho” to protect them, is the claim in the first verse. It is as if our country is the precious garden of Eden, yet our garden is so full of greed and weeds that the comparison must be noted as asinine.

Later in the song, the idea that money “trumps” morality is shown. The song essentially says, “Hey, don’t worry about morality, we have power, which is what all nations desire.”

Many would say that power leads to corruption and that the love and idolization of money many times leads to the slow degradation of empathy for a great deal of things such as other systems and humans which are not possessed by the rich.

The way Clementine’s voice and hands and seemingly, soul, begin shaking as he belts out the single word “Power” made my heart shake as well. Is it too punny to say that part of the song was very powerful?

The nation itself seems to be shaking. Some anticipation, some fear, some dread. What I find hope in though, is that protesters and artists, movers and shakers, will continue to speak up about issues that are affecting them so that those on the Hill will have to hear.

Read this fantastic article from Uproxxx to find out more about the Gorillaz new album!

Source: Uproxx

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